The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller

15th June 2016 Ann-Cathrine 0

What more can possibly be said about the Greek classics? How many more versions can we endure? Why can’t we just stay with Homer’s version? One answer to some of these questions is undoubtedly because the Illiad is at the foundation of the Western culture. We cannot avoid it even if we tried. The story of Helen’s elopement with Paris and the long siege of Troy speaks to everyone of us. We all identify with one or another of the heroes and heroines, and feel the otherworldly and larger-than-life lives they led. The passion, the thirst for glory and divinity, […]

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Inspired by Marilyn Monroe – Fragments

1st June 2016 Ann-Cathrine 0

  Some years ago, a collection of Marilyn Monroe‘s letters and papers was published in a lovely book called Fragments and since I have always had a soft spot for her, I of course needed it. My favourite part of it was seeing her handwriting; a bit weird perhaps but I love handwriting and lament the loss of it. So much personality goes into it and you can make up stories just by the subtle and not so subtle changes in it. My second favourite part of the book was the small appendix featuring some of the books she owned […]

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My Year with Proust – Swann’s Way

3rd May 2016 Ann-Cathrine 0

I have a reading goal this year and not just a number to reach like at Goodreads, but rather like an accomplishment in refining my world literature knowledge. That is a general goal for me and why I usually gravitate toward classics and philosophical books. This year I am attempting to read all of Marcel Proust’s In Search of Time Lost and I have recently finished the first of seven(!) instalments, Swann’s Way. (Note: I am reading the newly translated version in Danish by publisher Multivers who has also broken up most instalments into two volumes, so here I have […]

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Charlotte Brontë Bicentennial

21st April 2016 Ann-Cathrine 0

Can we imagine a world of literature without Jane Eyre? Since Charlotte Brontë’s catapulting entry into literary fame, along with her sisters, our notion of the world and how literature portrays our world have changed. Today marks the 200th birthday of Charlotte Brontë and though she is to some extent eclipsed by the Bard this Saturday (and the British queen today as well), she deserves a celebration of her accomplishments in her all too short life.

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My New Obsession: Youtube Literature Adaptations

27th March 2016 Ann-Cathrine 0

Spring and Easter greetings everyone, First of all, I apologize for the absence from here. Things took a couple of unexpected turns and threw me off track for a bit but now I am back and better than ever! And despite the universe having an opinion on my life, I have managed to read several books and have caught up on some of the Youtube adaptations of literary classics. I guess, the literature vlog trend started with the highly popular The Lizzy Bennet Diaries, a vlog version of Pride & Prejudice, and since then, most of Jane Austen’s novels have found their […]

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Currently Reading #1

16th February 2016 Ann-Cathrine 0

I think this will be a nice way of showing you what I am reading at the moment and something which I will make a recurring feature between reviews and other posts. Just to let you know what I am up to! Especially since some books need me musing and chewing on them for a little while before I can make up my mind about them. Of course, if you follow me on Goodreads (@literamour) then you already know and most of the time, they also show up on Instagram as well. Anyways, let me introduce them:

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Uprooted by Naomi Novik

9th February 2016 Ann-Cathrine 0

Everyone expects beautiful and talented Kasia of the Valley close to the Wood to be chosen by the greatest wizard in the country and their lord, the Dragon, to become his new servant at his tower. He has always chosen the most beautiful and special of the girls born in the Dragon year for the past hundred years. The chosen girl comes to live and serve for ten years from their seventeenth year and is then let go back to her home with a dowry. But the girls never stay, they are somehow changed and go away without ever coming […]

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Oriental Tales by Marguerite Yourcenar

19th January 2016 Ann-Cathrine 0

At the beginning of this year, I read Oriental Tales by Marguerite Yourcenar (1903-1987) who is recognized as the first female member of the French Academy in 1980 and thus a member of ‘les immortels‘. Considering, the Academy was established in 1635 by Richelieu (yes, the evil cardinal from The Three Musketeers), it was about time to recognize the female artists and thinkers of the French language, no? Yourcenar is mainly known for Hadrian’s Memoirs, about the Roman emperor, which was published in 1951.

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